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Wednesday
Jun182014

Try to Imagine ... The Living Seas

Wednesday
May212014

SeaRise

Symbolizing the dynamic and interconnected relationship between the ocean, sky, and our mother star, The Living Seas Entry Mural, designed by Tim Delaney, was a modern masterpiece of multi-dimensional design. With its colorful currents and dramatic seascape refracting the sunlight, the mural not only emphases the pavilion’s theme but also accurately depicts the ratio of a planet that should have been named Sea not Earth as its surface is mostly covered by water.

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Designer’s Note:
Just as with Energy’s Mural, I was dealing with the same problem of a very wide subject matter on a comparatively narrow screen. This time it was determined to have the focal point occupy more than 50% of the desktop image. In order to accomplish this I wanted to (vertically) extend the mural well beyond the confines of the original pavilion entry. Also, I had to concede that the mural could not be exhibited fully and approximately 30% of its length would have to be cropped. 

Several test later, and to spite its uniquely multi-layered presentation, the desktop background was completely lacking in depth. Fast-forward a few months, and I finally hit upon a solution of multiple “backlit” Art Deco-influenced layers that would both increase depth and would maintain focus on Tim's original masterpiece.

Point of Interest:
The waveforms below the mural are exact replicas of wavy railings that originally encircled the pavilion’s marquee. 

Friday
Apr252014

Building Better Logos

The JLH Omnimedia section returns from an 18-month hiatus with a behind the scenes look into the creation of a special collection of assets for The E82 Project...

Viewers Like YOU!


Now, more than ever, E82 survives thanks to the support of visitors like you. Donations have been sparse lately, and I need your help to continue the project.  And there has never been a better time to contribute. 

If you can, Please Make a Donation to Insure E82 Continues Now and Into the Future.

Monday
Mar242014

SSE Hues - Heliotropic 

Debuting shortly before EPCOT Center’s 10th Anniversary, this lighting scheme of Pink & Purple with highlights of golden amber has become the signature color scheme of the geosphere during the past two decades.

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You’ll also notice this is the first edition of the SSE Hues series to feature all four background formats, made possible by a new “Lighting Rig” that should be much easier to control and manipulate during for “Hues” yet to come!

Saturday
Feb222014

Electric Umbrella

Certainly the most unusually themed restaurant in Epcot (if not all of Walt Disney World) is the Electric Umbrella. Beginning its life as the awesomely titled (and yet completely irrelevant) “Stargate Restaurant” the quick service facility was re-themed in 1994 by Disney Legend Rolly Crump based on a literal merchandise item sold at Centorium during the time.

Although not original to the restaurant, these relatively new carpet titles continue Rolly’s characteristically kooky theme by complimenting the venue’s over-scaled umbrellas above with giant rings of multi-colored water droplets below. 

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Personal Note:
I’ve recently heard that I’m becoming infamous in Epcot circles as “the guy that’s been doing all the carpets!” And although that’s funny, it’s not exactly what I’d like people to know E82 for. Fortunately, there are only a few (3) custom carpets left in the park to “get out of my system”. Especially ones like this of such exacting detail…

Designer’s Note:
In this specific case, the Electric Umbrella has a few unique properties that were difficult to master, including a seemingly random tile pattern and alternating seam lines/groves consumed over 60% of my in recreating the piece. For while the circular forms themselves were quite easy to make, figuring-out the right thickness and application of lines that would scale correctly for the computer screen took an considerable amount of trial & error to achieve.